Hiya Paul, thanks for joining us in the virtual RGM lounge today, grab a brew and take a seat.

Cheers! I’ll have a virtual Domaine de la Romanee-Conti Grand Cru 1945, please. With coke.

What made you decide that music is a thing for you?

It’ll sound a bit crap, but it decided for me. My parent never listened to music, but tunes and words started invading my head from the age of 7. I’ve never consciously sat down to write anything. Melodies spring out at completely random moments. I can be out shopping, and suddenly need to find a quiet aisle to sing something into my phone recorder. It needs to get out, from somewhere.

Introduce us to you all and your musical history.

As a wee lad I was in a band that really did have everything… alcoholism, drugs, gambling addiction, bankruptcy, breakdowns, life-changing motorbike crashes.. and that was just the bass player. It might explain the preference to be a solo artist now!

What’s the live music scene like in Wembley right now? Anyone we should be looking out for (Bar you of course)

Well, there’s a venue down the road which claims to put good bands on occasionally, but they sound pretty lame from my garden ☺
Seriously though, there’s lots of great new young bands emerging at moment, if not local to me. Shouts out especially to The Mysterines, English Teacher, The Blinders, The Ks.. It feels like a proper resurgence.

I’ve seen a lot of people struggling for support recently online. Whats your view on the industry?

Unfortunately, a career in music has always been the dream of many and attained by very few. There’s thousands of songwriters and musicians out there who gave up purely because it’s so hard to make a living out of it. But I think it’s changing in very good ways now. The ability for artists to self-release directly to potential fans has exploded compared to a few years go. Streaming payments are pitiful (and always have been), but they’re great exposure for building a fan base which could support the artist with vinyl releases, etc. But do it for love, as you’ll never be rich from it.

Tell us Two truths and a lie about you.

* I went to 15 different primary schools
* I once saw Brett Anderson’s willy in a pub toilet in Camden
* I’m a multi-platinum award winning songwriter with 3 Grammy’s, 2 Oscars and an Ivor Novello.
(guess which are true, which is a lie!)

What was your worst experience on stage?

On a pub tour, playing to literally one person because the venue hadn’t put anything on their event list. 2 songs in he asked if we knew any Pink Floyd, so we looked one up on Ultimate Guitar tabs & gave it a go. Because, why not? Halfway though he walked out. Still got paid!

What are the next steps you plan to take to reach the next level?
There isn’t a firm plan, but I have a second single recorded to release in the Autumn. Hopefully that will see whether there’s enough interest to record an album. I have 14 songs completed & ready to go – if anyone wants to hear them..?

I hear you have a new music, what can you tell us about it.

“Carousel” describes the process of passing through different relationships in life – romantic or friendships. At the start especially they can be dizzying, like whirling around on a funfair ride, and it’s difficult to see clearly. The more we emotionally invest in a relationship, the bigger the disappointment they can be if we’re not aware of the projections we naturally overlay onto others.

What was the recording process like?

I write, play, sing, record and produce everything on my own, so self-discipline is critical. Time is precious. “Carousel” was probably 20 hours work, but spread over 3 weeks. My primary instrument used to be keyboards, but these days I demo more on guitar and transfer it to piano to find phrasing and harmonies. This is a pretty straight rock song, but there’s more experimental work to come.

What was the biggest learning curve in writing the new tunes?

I think I’m finally making the music I’ve always aspired to, and learning DAW software with infinite channels has made that possible. If I was in a band, playing each part individually, it would need 20 members!

Would you change anything now it’s finished?

Oh, all of it 😀 Being a perfectionist really doesn’t help. I can only hear the flaws – especially in the vocals, as that’s the most personal element. I don’t like hearing myself, and rely on friends to tell me where the vox levels should be. I’ll mix it too low otherwise.

Is there anything else you would like to share with the world?

This is probably the best time ever to be a fan of music. Love it, live it, let it consume you. Seek out and embrace new sounds and music will reward you. It is out there, so never settle for what’s unimaginative or been done a million times before.

FOLLOW WEBSITE

MORE REVIEWS FROM RGM HERE

The post RGM INTRODUCING – WE INTERVIEW PAUL CLARE WHAT HAPPENED? first appeared on RGM : REYT GOOD MAGAZINE.

By mykct